Vegan cosmetics

Vegan cosmetics are not just a fad

Chicken bone marrow found in moisturizers.

“When I stopped eating animal ingredients, I never had acne again,” Woody Harrelson, a movie star and longtime vegan, told Peta in an interview. Vegan cosmetics work according to this logic. If animal products harm the body from the inside, why introduce harmful ingredients from the outside?

Not only animal rights activists are outraged by the state of the cosmetic industry, but also cosmetic experts. It is amazing that in the 21st century there is a campaign to label cosmetic products that contain traces of cockroaches. In cosmetics, we find much more: snail slime, chicken bone marrow and waste fat by-products.

Bone marrow and mucus in antiaging creams

You’ll find chicken bone marrow in antiaging moisturizers under the label “glucosamine.” The law is satisfied if glucosamine is listed among the ingredients – chicken bone marrow is an excellent source of it – but not the origin of the individual ingredient. In a similar way, snail slime enters anti-aging creams, making the skin soft and supple. You can find it in creams under the label “KNU”.

Even red lipstick is not innocent

If you have any blush at home, check whether carmine or “carmine” is listed among the ingredients. It is obtained from special bugs that feed on cacti. The workers pick these from the cacti and let them dry, and when dried, they are ground into something that the cosmetics industry calls “carmine”. Since 2011, there has been a campaign to label products containing insects, but so far it has been unsuccessful.

Emulsifier from animal fat

The American Skin Deep Cosmetic Safety Association discovered even more shocking information. Waste animal fat is used as an emulsifier for soaps and lipsticks. This emulsifier comes from the by-products of cooking meat. In order to make even more profit, according to SDCS, they allegedly process expired meat, euthanized animals and even animals that are run over by cars.

There are alternatives

Scientists have all the necessary knowledge to create more humane cosmetic ingredients. Until recently, sperm whale sperm was used as a perfume stabilizer in cosmetic products. When the information became public, pressure from activists and public dismay led to the withdrawal of this ingredient from cosmetic products and a ban on its further use. Cosmetic companies with high ethical standards carefully avoid the use of these ingredients, and their offerings do not necessarily have to be expensive. Among the cheaper providers is the brand Alverde, for example.

Author: boosdiet

i like to blog. i know how things work. i have my perspective and i like to hear what you have to say.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: